Stores

Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.00085

Black and white photograph depicts William Benjamin Sylvester [1874-1931], son of Frank, on Sylvester Feed Company wagon.   

Date: 
[1890]
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.00040

Black and white etching of Oppenheimer Bros. Importers and Wholesale Grocers,  South East Corner of Powell and Columbia Streets.   

Date: 
1890
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.40648

B&W photograph depicts a horse drawn buggy with people sitting in it, in front of a building where the front reads, "Pioneer Furniture, A. I. Bind."

Image featured in Cyril Leonoff's "An Enterprising Life Leonard Frank Photographs 1895 - 1944."

Date: 
December 9, 1911
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.40439

B&W photograph depicts tomatoes on the vine hanging upside down in a building.
 

Date: 
[1894 - 1920]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara


Lando's General Store, Prince Rupert
Rights - JMABC


Ben & Ann Segall's Clothing and Footwear Ltd., Princeton
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39268

B&W photograph depicts people standing in front of the S. Leiser and Hamburger general store in Wellington, Vancouver Island, BC.

Date: 
1896
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
 
 
ID:          What was your father’s business, Esmond?
 
EL:          Father? Well, he started out…I think he worked with Shineman in his general store, then he opened up a…right across from the Prince Rupert Hotel which was a new hotel I think it was on First Avenue, next to the [West Home] Theatre. He had a place that sold tobaccos, groceries, fruit, anything you’d lay your hand on. And it was a great place. The fishermen came in and they didn’t buy…the Norwegian fishermen, they didn’t buy a package of cigarettes. They come in and bought four big two foot rolls of snus [finely ground tobacco taken orally] or they’d take a plug of tobacco but a plug of tobacco had to be a foot long and about an inch thick and five inches wide and they took the whole thing with them. They took these things out with them and chewed on them when they were away for two or three, four, five, or six weeks so it was…they came in and apparently they were very fond of buttermilk and they had buttermilk by the tub being dumped there and apparently the older buttermilk the more higher it got and these boys liked high buttermilk so they it became quite a place. The…punch boys were the thing at that time, they had gold watch fobs and you had to punch…you had a punch business, you sold 10 punches for a dollar and if you got a lucky number you got a gold watch fob. They’d come in and spend 10, 20, 20, 40 dollars trying to get themselves a 10 dollar gold fob. It was the pioneer people with really nothing to do and no entertainment.
 
ID:          This was their entertainment.

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Joe Segal in the Field's warehouse
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.17061

Black and white photograph depicts the Nemetz store in Zelma Saskatchewan; Grandfather W. Karasov holding Phyliss Nemetz with Milton Nemetz in the sled.

Date: 
1923
Source: 
Neuman, Lil