Women

Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.38949

B&W photograph depicts men and women standing in a dinning room at an International Timber Co. Ltd. logging camp.

Date: 
[1922]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.38935

B&W photograph depicts many men standing on a rail car, which is attached to a locomotive, in a clear cut area.  Logs are loaded on rail cars behind them and in the background is a spar tree.

Hand written caption on back of original 8" x 10" print mounted on board reads, "March 25, 1920. Capilano Timber Co. Ltd. CPR passenger agents visiting logging operations."
 

Date: 
[March 25, 1920]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.38931

B&W photograph depicts many men and women sitting on a rail car, which is attached to a locomotive, in clearcut area.

Hand written caption on back reads, "Imperial Press Conference visiting Capilano Timber Co. Ltd. North Vancouver, B.C. Aug. 7, 1919."

Date: 
[August 7, 1919]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.38923

B&W photograph depicts a high rigger, Charlie Koski, capping a douglas fir spar tree.

Hand written caption on the back of original 10" x 8" print mounted on board reads: "Highrigger was Charlie Koski.  Douglas fir approximately 215 ft. high. Capilano Timber Co. Ltd. North Vancouver, B.C. Copyright photograph 1918 (taken about 1914)."

Date: 
[1914 -1918]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
CF:         In later years, when I guess I was a teenager or just before we used to go Sundays to the beaches up at Parksville or Qualicum and Mother used to get up around six or seven in the morning and cook and bake like you wouldn’t believe. She would cook a roast, a beef roast, she would usually make chopped herring and eggs or chopped sardines and eggs, and she would inevitably make a pie, probably a blackberry pie. And she always had trouble with the blackberries running over into the inside of the stove. And it was, in those days, you know, no self-cleaning ovens, etcetera, and not even any Easy-Off. So it was a real problem. And she would talk to people and get various ideas and one of the things, one idea was to get straw, do you know that? And you would cut them maybe in half and put them in so the juice so the blackberries would go up and stay in the straw rather than run over on to the oven floor.
 
RT:         This was your picnic fare?
 
CF:         Yeah, I mean that was, but she used to get up so early in the morning and this was after working five, six days a week. And she often times, you know, did her own housework. And she did not have an automatic washing machine for many, many, many years. She had a wringer washer.
 
RT:         And hung outside?
 
CF:         Sometimes it would be hung outside, yeah.

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Gerry Biely (right) and Elaine Charkow (left)
Rights - JMABC


'Dr. & Mrs. Art', l-r: Mrs. W. Solomon holding, Mrs. A. Hayes
Rights - JMABC


Talmud Torah class with Gita Kron
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
                Interviewer: Marvin Weintraub & Cyril E. Leonoff
 
 
               MW:      Yes. Phyllis you had a few, a few things that you started in the [Beth Israel] synagogue, didn’t you?
 
               PS:          Actually yes the very first thing that I started was at a suggestion from Rita, from your wife, and that was what we called Institute Aleph. As we mentioned before there were really only two synagogues in the city and there was not much going on education wise for the women, there were no classes, and so the concept, the idea came into being that we should start a morning class and it turned out to be a Thursday morning class and we called it Institute Aleph because we always felt that we were starting, we were always starting from the beginning and there was just so much to learn that we would never get beyond aleph. [Laughter]. That first year, that first year, and it was going to be courses in basic Judaism and then as it turned out, and the classes developed, we discussed history and philosophy and ethics and many other things. The first class we had about 60 women that came out and they represented different parts of the community, people from Schara Tzedeck, because there was nothing else. But after that class we had anywhere between 20 and 40 people that would come on a Thursday morning for maybe eight sessions in the fall and eight sessions in the spring. And out of that group, which went on from 1967 until about I don’t know for about 20 years, I think. Every Thursday morning there were about five or six people, women, who started with us in ’67 and went all the way through. And then there were of course all these new people. And this was a great joy to me because it was not just a question of teaching, it was a question of exchanging ideas. We sat around the table and we discussed things.

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Pioneer Women meeting - Cissie Eppel sitting on far right
Rights - JMABC