British Columbia

Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
 
 
 
 
JG:          When you came to Victoria were you looking to connect with the Jewish community?
 
LS:          No. No way was I, I wasn’t, I was what I call relatively neutral, Jewishly. I didn’t hide but I didn’t really do too much. You know I, sometimes, you know, melodies would come and things like that. The Victoria story, it’s only in Victoria is this story possible. So when Charlotte and I were about to get married, I met Charlotte here in Victoria at a therapy workshop. So as we started a relationship, we started to get married she didn’t even know I was Jewish really originally. It turns out that Charlotte had independently of anything to do with me always been interested in Israel and Zionism. And actually spent some time on a kibbutz, right. So, but as the marriage started and, you know, and I’m in a different phase in my life something started to happen where I wanted to do something to do with Yiddishkeit [the Jewish way of life] in my marriage. So, I started the talk around and to see what I could do about that. There was no rabbi here at the time. So I talked to someone who was sort of functioning as a lay spiritual leader. He wouldn’t officiate which I certainly respect now, and I did at the time. So we were married by a Unitarian minister. And my brothers came up from, where were they, one in California, one in North Carolina, I think, for the wedding. And we interpolated, you know, some Jewish thematic material. But it was through that marriage that I started dipping my foot back, my feet back into the waters. So I went to shul. And you can’t imagine what it was like then. It was chaotic, nobody knew what they were doing. So the first time I’m at shul nobody’s there who’s able to doven [lead prayers] or lead shachrit [morning prayers]. So they say, “Can anybody do this?” I knew I could do this because spontaneously at different times in my life the melodies would just come back to me. So I did. And that was really the beginning of my reconnection, yeah, which is now becoming, you know, the centre [of my life]. So that’s the story. It’s not an unusual story for Victoria. Many, many of the people in the congregation of Victoria had very little to do with Yiddishkeit, very tangential in their lives. And somehow or other either through children or through something, you know they had to make some kind of movement, but tremendously deepen their connection with [Jewry] here in Victoria.
 
JG:          So what does the synagogue or what is the synagogue, the Temple Emanu-El that allows people to do this?
 
LS:          It’s really hard to describe because it’s a culture of encouragement, permissiveness, but limit setting at the same time. People have a lot of room to move into leadership roles here. And we encourage participation. So we encourage training, we teach each other, and different people move in and out of the limelight along that. So that’s just, sometimes it’s just been necessity because that’s the way it was but now it’s a value.

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Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39123

B&W photograph depicts a locomotive in a train yard.

Old catalogue form has "C.P.R. photos of the late Mr. Duke McKenzie, veteran engineer" as the title.

Date: 
[1886 - July 1929]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39122

B&W photograph depicts a wooden bridge over a cliff.  Writing at bottom of negative reads, "Stoney Creek highest wooden brige in the world no. 10."

Old catalogue form has "C.P.R. photos of the late Mr. Duke McKenzie, veteran engineer" as the title.

Date: 
[1886]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
                Interviewer: Cyril E. Leonoff & A. Myer Freedman
 
 
               MF:        At that time you didn’t practice in Vancouver at all, you went directly to the Yukon?
 
               IS:           I practiced in interior British Columbia for a couple of months: Lillooet, Lytton, Ashcroft, and then Dr. Franks had gone up North that fall and he did so well and saw the need of dentists in that part of the country, he asked me if I would join him. So in 1925, in January, we left for Stewart, British Columbia. And we were supposed to take over a dental practice of an unlicensed dentist there but we didn’t like Stewart and we kept going and finally got to Skagway and from Skagway we went to Whitehorse. And we got to Whitehorse and we found out that there had been two dentists living in the Yukon: one had passed away and the other had left for Seattle. And there were no dentists in the Yukon at all. So that was our reason for going into Whitehorse and then into Dawson.
 
MF:        And you moved about from city to city as your services were required?
 
IS:           Yeah, we had portable equipment that we could set up in about two or three hours and we would be ready to work.
 
CL:         This was Robert Franks?
 
IS:           Robert Franks.
 
CL:         And he was the son of Zebulon…
 
IS:           Zebulon Franks.
 
CL:         Were you the first two Jewish boys that graduated from dentistry?
 
IS:           No, the first Jewish dentist here was Dr. Gerald Plant and there was another dentist, I can’t recall his name now, about that time.
 
CL:         And where did they get their training?
 
IS:           Gerald Plant also got [his] from North Pacific College in Oregon.
 
CL:         How much before you would he have been?
 
IS:           Four or five years before we graduated.
 
MF:        Did you meet any other Jewish people in the Yukon at that time?
 
IS:           There was…We only ran across one man who was mining about 60 miles out of Dawson. But I did meet various Jewish people because in the summer time the tourist boats would come into Dawson. And I went down and met the rabbi from Los Angeles, I can’t remember his name now…[Magnun]. Rabbi [Magnun]. And I saw his name in the paper as having arrived in Dawson so I went down on the boat and I made myself known to him. And he said, “How would a young fellow like you decide to come up here and practice dentistry in the Yukon [laughing]?” So I told him the same story I’m telling you…

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
               LR:         What was the industry like at that time? I mean were people very competitive with people who were both, you know, in the business and also comrades today. Did they socialize? Was there a lot of competition? Was there any sort of…
 
               MG:       It was a brand new city and competition was there. It’s always there even in a small town. Depends what you do with it, you know. If you have the ambition or the creativeness to make it, you build in that knowledge to what you already know.
 
DG:        It’s not as scary as it is today. Competition then was, you know, provided by stores like Woodward’s or the odd number of independents that were around but I think what helped my father stand out was his personality and his knowledge and love of the business. And his flair for promotion. And so he really was a leader in his category in those days and remained so for many years.
 
LR:         What kind of promotions did you have? Did you have anything that was like, you know, ‘buy one, get this, this, this and that’ or…
 
MG:       Well, that was a normal thing, yeah. Buy one, get one free. Or we’d have two for one suit sales. And with a jingle, “There’s not a single suit for sale at Murray Goldman, that’s because they come in twos.” So there was always a catch.
 
DG:        He would give away things with the purchase of a suit that were very innovative for their day. For instance, when portable radios first came out in the 1950s it was a very new product. It was a radio you could play without plugging it into the wall. You know, not so earth-shattering today but then it was very innovative. And you would get one free with the purchase of a suit.
 
LR:         Oh wow.
 
DG:        Did the same thing with movie cameras when they first came out in the early 1960s.
 
MG:       Kodak movie camera.
 
DG:        Kodak movie camera, get one free with the purchase of a suit. At a time when the BC Lions and football was particularly meaningful in the city he would give away a pair of Grey Cup tickets with the purchase of a suit. You couldn’t buy a pair of Grey Cup tickets in those days, they would sell out very quickly. You could get a pair free for the purchase of a suit. Very innovate in its day.

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
DE:         In Manila our family was very prominent. My mom taught Hebrew to the other Jewish families. There was about a hundred Jewish families in Manila and most of them wanted to keep some Jewish identity. My mom spoke fluent Hebrew so she taught Hebrew to the kids. Whenever there were Jewish holidays, you know, all the Jewish families would get together and it was a very, very amicable, lots of comradery between these hundred families or so. Even now I think my mother’s best friends, her best times were those years in Manila when she was a young mom and everyone got together.
 
GG:        Was there a synagogue and a rabbi there in Manila?
 
DE:         Yeah, yeah, there was. Although there were some things that we couldn’t get. For example a mohel [someone who performs circumcisions]. When my younger brother was born there was no mohel in Manila and we used to usually fly a mohel in from San Francisco to do any brises that came up in Manila. We had big problem with my younger brother because he was born on Rosh Hashanah and eight days later was going to be the day before Yom Kippur and no rabbi, no mohel wanted to travel that far away and be away on Yom Kippur. But we managed to arrange flights so that he could fly to Manila, do the procedure, and fly back to San Francisco before Yom Kippur started.
 
GG:        Thank goodness for the time zones [laughs].
 
DE:         Yeah. My mother’s side of the family is extremely religious. My grandfather, the one from Krakow, deeply, deeply religious man. He was the shochet [kosher butcher]. And although he was never a rabbi in Trieste he was considered as such. He was the chochem [wise man] of the city. I think the rabbis came to him to ask him for his opinion on things. He’s passed away now but I remember him as a deeply, deeply religious man. And…
 
GG:        Did you know your father’s father?
 
DE:         No, my father’s father died before I was born. So both sides of our family really had a lot of Jewish upbringing and passed it on through the generations.
 
GG:        When your parents came to Vancouver where did they affiliate here religiously?
 
DE:         Well, we left Manila in a bit of a hurry because things started to get rough in Manila in the mid-‘70s politically. Martial law was imposed. The army was running the country and anybody who could get out, anybody who had some money, started to leave. And my brothers and I were reaching high school age so my parents always thought we would end up going to university somewhere in North America. So they thought it was a good time to pack up the family and move. But they really had no ties to any other place in the world. My dad had some family in San Francisco and my mom’s family was in Israel but they didn’t, they weren’t so close that they wanted to live either in San Francisco or Israel. So the whole world was open to us and we travelled around for quite a few months trying to decide where we were going to live. And in the end Vancouver won because Vancouver was everything that they always wanted. It was a quiet place, it was in a quiet country where nothing really happens [laughs]. It was beautiful. Schools were good. It was safe. You know, wars were never going to happen here. I think it was everything that they could not get when they were growing up in Europe and in Asia during the war. So we settled here.

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Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39120

B&W photograph depicts a locomotive with sign that reads, "God save the Queen."

Date: 
[December 31, 1900]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39118

B&W photograph depicts a spar tree being used to lift logs with two men sitting on a log on the right side of the photo.
 

Date: 
[April 1929]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39117

B&W photograph depicts two men standing in front of cedar trees in a forest, one man has an axe.

Date: 
[February 1920]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.39115

B&W photograph depicts logs being loaded onto a flat bed truck with a man sitting behind the steering wheel and another standing beside the logs being loaded on.

Hand written caption on back of original 10" x 8" mounted on linen or canvas reads, "First action photo of early truck logging Godfredson" [sic] Logging Truck Commerical Lumber Co. Ltd. Pt. Haney, B.C. Jan. 22, 1929" 

Date: 
[January 22, 1929]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara