British Columbia



Beth Israel, New Bimah
Rights - JMABC


Wedding (first) of Bev Segal, with her father Jack Segal
Rights - JMABC


Lando's General Store, Prince Rupert
Rights - JMABC


Clara Wise and Charles Waldman wedding, Trail, B.C.
Rights - JMABC


Hat factory workers, Charles Korsch Ltd., 560 Cambie Street
Rights - JMABC


Sam Kaplan working machine surrounded by students
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
                LK:          In the days I went to university which was 1939 to ’42 there was a Jewish fraternity on the campus. It was small in number but we, there were only about a dozen or fifteen at the most Jewish boys that belonged to this. It was called Kappa Theta Rho and I can remember the names of some of the people who belonged during those days. There was Alvin Narod was the president when I joined.
 
EN:         Oh yes.
 
LK:          And there was, there, Harold [Rome], there was…Harry Weiner, Ed Gross, Edward Gross. Ed won the Governor General’s gold medal on the graduating class in the year we graduated in ’42.
 
EN:         In what field?
 
LK:          In, it was, for the whole university, the top grad in the university. He was in arts. He eventually went on to become a professor of psychology and spent many years at the University of Washington. And then when he, when he retired from that job he went back and became, went into law and became a law professor.
 
EN:         Great.
 
LK:          Strangely enough Ed was just recently in Vancouver and he phoned me, we had a chat on the phone.
 
EN:         Oh, how interesting.
 
LK:          Yeah. And who else remembers? Oh, Ralph James was a member of Kappa Theta Rho and Irving Koenigsberg, and…I don’t know who else.
 
EN:         But that’s very good.
 
LK:          Anyhow, Kappa Theta Rho was a local fraternity and we were affiliated with a national Zeta Beta Tau and eventually the year after, the year I graduated we finally became full-fledged members of Zeta Beta Tau.
 
EN:         And is that fraternity still active on the campus today?
 
LK:          No, I don’t know what happened. During the intervening years they went through some big years, they became very big on the campus, they had a fraternity house. And then I think all fraternities went into kind of an eclipse and they disappeared or they…Anyway, I don’t know whatever came of it, and there is now a new resurgence and my grandson is a member of the new Jewish fraternity on the campus [laughs].

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
                  HS:           Other things like big presents like my mom and dad would go away and come back and Audrey and I were each given an English bike, a Raleigh, and they were beautiful.
Posted by jyuhasz
 
               HW:       I was always a good, good athlete. When, in the early years, when we used to go to the rink in Winnipeg. Do you know Winnipeg at all?
 
 
CL:         Oh yeah, born in Winnipeg, brought up in Winnipeg.
 
HW:       Oh yes, well, you know the Drewery’s? Yeah, right by Drewery, alongside of the brewery. We used to go there Saturday night, all the Jewish crowd at that time. We’d all skate together. The Weidmans, the Wodlingers, the Zimmermans, the whole flock. And we’d skate there until whatever time, 11, 11:30 and about every three or four weeks we’d have a hockey game between the Weidmans and the Wodlingers. We had a team each.
 
CL:         [There was enough of you].
 
HW:       We had to bring in one boy only from Selkirk that was one of Sam Wodlinger’s, he was a goalkeeper for the Selkirk team. He used to come and play goal for us. Weidmans had a full compliment. We used to play…and all these Jewish people stayed to see these games, you know, after the skating time was over we’d take over the ice and have a game.

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Posted by jyuhasz
                Judy Zaitzow was interviewed with her sister Dorothy Grad and Michael Zaitzow.
 
                DG:        Yeah, let me go back a little bit to our growing up years. Some of the activities that we did that which we haven’t talked about. Lillian and Judy were both excellent tennis players. Judy to this day still plays tennis. She never put her tennis racquet down. I put mine down and picked it up again at age 40 and played for about 15 years until I wrecked a knee. But Judy has carried on doing that. But I think these are sort of important activities that sort of carry on. And there’s a core of people who have carried on. I know some people sort of picked it up later on.
 
 
JZ:          But we were interested in tennis because our mother was a tennis player.
 
DG:        Yeah.
 
JZ:          And she got to the city finals in about 1912 or something so I mean, you know, that’s how we picked it up. But I used to, that was another activity we used to do in Stanley Park. They boys, we’d go down and play tennis with the boys when we were growing up.
 
DG:        Yeah, yeah, the boys were good tennis players.
 
JZ:          You know like Norman Archek and…
 
DG:        Will Becker.
 
JZ:          Will Becker who built western indoor tennis, I mean, you know, and he to this day plays brilliant and one of his kids was on the tour. And…Norman and who else played? Izzy Diamond played, we all played. I mean, we all went and played tennis when we were kids and I just never stopped. I stopped for about five years while I had children.

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