Richmond

Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.18360

Colour photograph depicts a table of children with challah.

Date: 
1993-1994
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.18359

Colour photograph depicts an unidentified woman and two children lighting a menorah.

Date: 
1993-1994
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.18358

Colour photograph depicts a fireman showing children a fire truck.

Date: 
1993-1994


Raising of Canada's new flag at Richmond Country Club, Dr. White hands old Red Ensign to Esmond Lando
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
 
 
 
 
JB:          And what did your father do when he got to Vancouver as his occupation?
 
BH:         Well he did what everybody did when they first came, he peddled. Which means he went out, got old, used things and sold them to, by the pound, rags or metals or whatever. But many people, men, who came had no education, at first didn’t have any language, stayed with the junk business, but my father loathed it with a passion, and he was very ambitious, worked very, very hard, and in no time he had graduated from a little push-cart to a horse and wagon, and shortly after that, it wasn’t long before he got rid of the horse and wagon and got a motor flatbed, a little motor truck and that’s when he began to go further afield, and he went into the Okanagan, not the Okanagan Valley, the Chilliwack, you know around the Chilliwack area…
 
JB:          The Lynn Valley?
 
BH:         Oh no, Lynn Valley is on the North Shore.
 
JB:          Fraser Valley?
 
BH:         The Fraser Valley, right. And he principally went to buy sacks, used sacks from feed and grain and so on from the farmers, it’s all farm country, and noticed that an awful lot of them had orchards on their farms and the fruit wasn’t being picked. So he asked around and found out that they couldn’t find pickers, it was too difficult for them. So anyway, he was a very enterprising man, he hired pickers and used his truck and transported cases of fruit, picked fruit, into Vancouver, sold them, and this went on for awhile and then he opened a big fruit and vegetable wholesale. And in the summer he’d haul stuff in from the Fraser Valley, and all year round he would import stuff from the States or from wherever it came. And he had, the rest of his life he had a fruit and vegetable wholesale.

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
 
 
 
 
JB:          And did they come to BC right away or did they…?
 
BH:         Yes, yes they came straight to BC.
 
JB:          Okay, do you remember when that was?
 
BH:         Of course. It was in September of 1923. About three, four days before Rosh Hashanah of that year.
 
JB:          And why did they come?
 
BH:         Why? Because of the revolution in Russia. And my father was a little bit considered of a capitalist and that’s not very good according to the Reds, you know? So there was a sort of an underground railroad, like you know in the States when the Americans had the underground railroad for the slaves, there was that kind of thing going on out of Russia where especially Jewish people were fleeing and that’s how we got out.
 
JB:          Did you come to Vancouver?
 
BH:         We came directly to—well we were met, when we docked at Halifax, we were met by a Jewish organization, HIAS I believe it was, I don’t know if you know of HIAS, it’s the Hebrew something Aid Society I forget but and, oh, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and, “Why don’t you stay in Montreal and Toronto and Winnipeg, the big Jewish centres?” And my father said he wanted to get as far away from Russia as he possibly could, so where could he go? And they said, “Well you can go all the way to the West Coast.” As it turns out, of course, you realize we are much closer to Russia than we would have been on the East Coast but that’s another story. And that’s why we came here, knowing nobody, having no relatives, no personal connections.

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
AC:        And they said that if you want you can go work a physical job. Abe said to me, “If you wanted to go to work with me on the truck…” I went out with him a couple times and I said to myself, “How this man is pulling this heavy drums with copper with things like that, you know.” But he handled this. So I went to, was a guy by the name of Charlie, Charlie…
 
GA:       Davis?
 
AC:        Davis. Number 2 Road. Number 2 and 2nd Avenue there. So he gave me a job to cut the copper. There’s a big, like a press, you know, and you had to cut because there were long stretches of copper, some cables, some plates, you know. So I was cutting them and filling up drums, you know. And then would come a big truck to lift them up and wherever they were sending, I don’t know it was not my business. And this was my beginning with him. And then again I went to the hospital to get in my profession [Arthur Chinkis had trained and worked as an x-ray technician in Russia]. I was already talking a little bit because there Charlie…were also people, immigrants, they were from all over the world. Polacks, Hungarian, everybody. But everybody tried to speak English that’s the way of communication. With Charlie I spoke Yiddish, you know, it was okay but with the workers you had to speak English. And at night I went on number 12th and Oak there was…
 
GA:        The Jewish…
 
AC:        In the olden days there was a school. That was a school for immigrants, at night, in a trailer…
 
GA:        Was that on King Edward, King Edward campus?
 
AC:        On 12th Avenue and…
 
GA:        Oak.
 
AC:         Oak Street.
 
GA:        That’s where King Edward…
 
AC:        King Edward is 25th Avenue.
 
GA:        No, no, no, King Edward High School.
 
AC:        Oh, King Edward High School.
 
GA:        Yeah and there was across from King Edward was a Jewish Community Centre.
 
AC:        Yeah, yeah, on 12th Avenue was it, yeah, on Oak Street. So at night I was going there taking courses in English. Made me, writing, reading, conversational, you know. I learned something and I went to this Vancouver General Hospital for an interview. I had my papers, all the papers, you know, everything good papers. The doctor said to me, “Everything is good but you don’t speak too much. You have to communicate with patients. A sick person is coming you have to ask him questions, you have to write it down the story and then do the job, do the x-rays.” I said to the doctor, “I have a suggestion for you and I think you will go for it. Put me for six months in the darkroom. I’ll work in the darkroom.” When you take a picture and go to the darkroom you have to develop it, and then dry it, and then cut the corners, and give it to the doctor to come, and doctors and put on his screen, viewing screen, you know. And he [did]. And that not required too much talking, just work.

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
AC:         But meantime, the government of Russian, not the governor of Moscow, announced that all children up to the age of 17 should leave the city because the Germans were bombing the city already and there was a lot of injuries. Mostly they were throwing fire igniting bombs from the airplanes, you know. And at night you would see, you’d think the whole city’s on fire because at night, you know, they turn, all the windows in the cities were taped with tape, you know. So from the bombing the glass won’t shatter. So all the windows were taped like that. So they announced that all the children can go south of the country. South of the country means go to Tashkent. The idea of going to Tashkent that it’s always warm, there is no winter there, there is no snow there. And because we were like that we didn’t have anything with us. I took just a pair of…what is this?
 
GA:         Pants?
 
AC:         Pa…Underwear…to change, socks, and that’s it, that’s all I took because I was going just for a visit, you know. But in Tashkent they said you’re okay, that you can sleep in the park and go [inaudible] in the river and wash your clothes and in an hour it’s dry because the sun is so hot like in Palm Springs, you know, it doesn’t take too long to dry a pair of…Anyways, the government organized a train to take all the people, all the young people to Tashkent.

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Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.14736

Black and white image of a group of people standing at a podium.

Date: 
[1980]
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.04198

Colour high angle image of the Arthur Lang Bridge, connecting Richmond to Vancouver.

Date: 
November 24, 1971
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara