Business object

Posted by jyuhasz
Interviewers: Irene Dodek & Sally Tobe
 
 
 
 
 
 
EC:         And so when I left, when I was finished with high school I was lucky to get a job at a firm called Parsons, Brown, and Winkler. The firm is still, it’s called Parsons, Brown.
 
[ID]:       Is that an accountants firm?
 
EC:         No, that’s an insurance company. And the Browns are, what’s his name, the wheeler dealer today.
 
[ID]:       Peter?
 
EC:         Peter Brown is the son of Ralph Brown, the youngest son of Ralph Brown who still lives in the area.
 
[ID]:       What sort of work did you do, Elaine?
 
EC:         I was, the, what would you call it, I think they just sort of used me to file and then I used to do the switchboard. Wait ‘til I tell you what they paid in those days. At noon I took over the switchboard when the regular person went to lunch. I tried to save the money when things got very bad...See, I graduated in 1931 and I was lucky to get a job that paid $25 a month.
 
[ID]:       This was during the Depression.
 
EC:         During the Depression and my father was sick and my mother had these boys rooming with us. And the next year things were so bad everybody had to take a 10% cut and my salary became 22.50. But you know the streetcar there was five cents each way, I took a brown bag lunch and I think I went to work as my sister went to school, we probably each had two skirts and a couple of blouses, and a sweater, and a coat, and a black pair of shoes for winter and a white one for summer.

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Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.020

These Hebrew letterpress blocks were used at Charles and Sarah Gorvich's Broadcast Printers, 3621 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC.

Date: 
1950
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.018

John Mahrer, an immigrant from Prague, opened a brewery in Nanaimo, a coal mining centre and port that is located north of Victoria on Vancouver Island. When the brewery amalgamated with the Union Brewery in 1891, Mahrer became its manager and master brewer. Mahrer was on the Nanaimo City Council for eight years and belonged to several charitable organizations as well as the city's band. John and Louise Mahrer's home and the Nanaimo Opera House, which John built, were the centres of Nanaimo's cultural life at the time.

Date: 
1890
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.016

Besides being the first recorded Jewish person to arrive in British Columbia, Alexander Aaron Phillips was Victoria's first baker of "Passover Bread" (matzoh), which he sold all over Vancouver Island and the state of Washington. In the fall of 1858 he opened the Pioneer Syrup, Soda and Cider Works. ALexander Phillips was the second president of Temple Emanu-El, a founding member of a local Masonic Lodge and Odd Fellows Lodge, as well as a member of the ST. George's Society and the British Columbia Benevolent Association.

Date: 
1880
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.015

In Vancouver, early twentieth century Jewish immigrants, who arrived from Russia, Romania, Poland, and Germany may not have been able to speak English, but they shared the Yiddish language. Developed in the late Middle Ages as a mix of Hebrew, German and Slavic languages, Yiddish was the common language of Eastern European Jews. In Strathcona, it was the language spoken in Jewish homes and in the sermons at the Synagogue.

Date: 
1920
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.014a

Used by David Matlin; apprenticed under his father Simon, who was a master tailor from Liverpool, England. The family immigrated to Winnipeg in 1907, when David was seventeen, he became a ladies' coat and dress designer, working in clothing factories in Winnipeg and Vancouver for over 50 years. He moved to Vancouver in 1952 and spent the last 35 years of his life there. This sewing machine was used in David Matlin's home.

Date: 
20th century
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
2006.28.001

Tie owned and worn by Murray Goldman, owner of Goldman and Son store, Vancouver, BC. Murray Goldman was born in Poland and raised in Montreal, Quebec, until he entered the armed forces in the Second World War. He was stationed in British Columbia and moved to Vancouver after he left the service. Goldman's entertaining marketing ploys, such as cutting his tie in half in a television ad promoting a half-price sale, contributed to his success as a menswear retailer and fashion leader.

Date: 
circa 1980s
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
2006.26.005

First Nations moccasins typical of souvenir goods sold at Lando's Ltd, "The House of Fine Furs" Vancouver, BC; owned by Harold Lando

Date: 
circa 1970s
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
2006.23.001a

Used at the Vancouver Manufacturing Umbrella Co. for steaming creases out of fabric used to make umbrellas.

Date: 
circa 1960s
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
2006.22.003

Used by Max Dodek of Max Dodek Fur Ltd. Tool used for pounding nails into and pulling nails out of skins.

Date: 
circa 1930s