Winnipeg

Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.01715

Black and white portrait of Nathan Nemetz on his third birthday. 

Date: 
1916
Source: 
Nemetz, Nathan
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.01523

Black and white photograph of Sonia Victor (nee Nemetz) and Bill Victor.    

Date: 
1917
Source: 
Dayson, Esther
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.01545

Black and white photograph of Sonia Nemetz Victor.

Date: 
[ca. 1916-1917]
Source: 
Dayson, Esther


Immigrants arriving at C.P.R. station heading West, Winnipeg ca. 1885
Rights - JMABC
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.17074

Black and white photograph depicts portrait on postcard stock of Boris (Baryl) Victor (left), Sarah (Sonyia) Victor (middle) and Harry Nemetz (right). Verso reads: "To Miss S. Braun Stein, From S. & H. Nemetz & B. Victor."

Date: 
1921 or 1922
Source: 
Neuman, Lil
Posted by rcosco
Object id: 
L.01546

Title continues: in Winnipeg; original print on post card stock

Date: 
1916
Source: 
Dayson, Esther
Posted by Anonymous
Object id: 
L.14595

B & W print.

Date: 
1970
Posted by jhsadmin

 

 

 

RT:     And what was the next move?

AC:    Winnipeg. And by that time that was January 1975 and that to me was one of the  most difficult things that we had done was move from where I was born which is really warm [former republic of Moldavia], to Israel which is warmer, to Belgium which is kind of wet, to Winnipeg which is just frigid, freezing cold and in 1975 the winters were harsh. I mean now obviously things, with Global Warming, things are a lot warmer. But, holy-moly, I hated Canada. [Laughter].
 
RT:         How old were you then about eight?
 
AC:         Seven and a half.
 
RT:         And when did your attitude about that change?
 
AC:         Like anything it takes time, a couple of years.
 
RT:         Make friends and stuff.
 
AC:         Yeah, that was hard too. I think when you come into a country and kids are mean sometimes when you have a bit of an accent. On top of it all it was the Eagle and the Bear, the cold war was going on and so people don’t see …
 
RT:         Suspicious?
 
AC:         Well don’t see beyond, even in a private Hebrew school, don’t see beyond the Russian part. Coming from a tough stock, coming from the school of hard knocks and surrounded by a lot of sheltered, very soft (I called the North American Jews very soft), thin skinned … I basically fought for my respect, you know, stood up for my rights. Maybe acquired a bit of a bully persona going throughout elementary and junior high school but if that’s what it took for me to gain respect I was going to get that, and that’s what it was and that’s fine.

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Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.014a

Used by David Matlin; apprenticed under his father Simon, who was a master tailor from Liverpool, England. The family immigrated to Winnipeg in 1907, when David was seventeen, he became a ladies' coat and dress designer, working in clothing factories in Winnipeg and Vancouver for over 50 years. He moved to Vancouver in 1952 and spent the last 35 years of his life there. This sewing machine was used in David Matlin's home.

Date: 
20th century
Posted by jhsadmin
Object id: 
L.2006.07.011

From Lechtzier bowling alley. In 1926 brothers Samuel, Saul, and Harris Lechtzier opened La Salle Recreations on Granville Street in Vancouver. It was the first modern bowling centre on the Pacific Coast.

Date: 
1950