Universities

Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.18966

Colour Kodachrome 35mm slide depicts the Brooks Memorial Mines Building, part of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.

Date: 
[1961]
Source: 
Snider, Irving
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
L.18965

Colour Kodachrome 35mm slide depicts people walking by the Wickersham Hall, part of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.

Date: 
[1961]
Source: 
Snider, Irving
Posted by jyuhasz
 
               GL:         University was a lot of fun for me, hard work but a lot of fun. Realizing that I was very young and I wanted to be a lawyer, and thinking that, first of all I had a very cherubic face, thinking that no one would want a lawyer…you know, if I went I would be out by the time I was 20, 19 or 20, and I thought no one is going to go to a lawyer who’s 19 or 20, so I decided to take two courses. I took BComm, Bachelor of Commerce and Law. In those days you could take a double degree and they gave you credit for an extra year, so you could take, I think, two years of commerce and three years of law and that gave you two degrees, instead of three years of commerce. So I went in, took my first year of arts, two years of commerce, and three years of law. I was…the Jewish kids at that time, there was still a bit of a division. Well no, there wasn’t as much of a division, there were two Jewish fraternities on campus. Oh, remember I couldn’t remember the name of the girls’ organization, Jewish organization; it was called B’nai B’rith Girls, BBGs for short. So there were two Jewish fraternities on campus, and one Jewish sorority. The ZBT [Zeta Beta Tau], the Zebes; the SAM [Sigma Alpha Mu], the Sammies; and DPhiEs [Delta Phi Epsilon], the Deefers. They were the girls. And I belonged to the ZBTs. Mostly, I shouldn’t say mostly, a lot of the guys from Magee that I had grown up with, but by that time they were mixing back and forth, so the guys from the east side, the west side, it didn’t matter. The Jewish girls on campus, it was a fairly new Jewish sorority; in those days there was a lot of sorority and fraternity things, a lot of activities, and a lot of social life was in fraternity and sorority life. And there was a picture in the Jewish Historical Society magazine, I think it was on the back cover, of a whole party of people; they sent away and they asked did anyone know the names of all these people. And I think I sent back mentioning the names of some of the people I didn’t know. That was a picture of a ZBT party, and I was there. I was one of the people in the picture.

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Posted by jyuhasz
 
 
               MW:      Now, how this started...Sid Zbarsky and I very often met at lunch time, we would bring bag lunch and then go for a walk through the trails at UBC, it was safe then and there weren’t huge developments of high rises and low rises and condominiums and so on, it was really wooded and we really enjoyed walking there. And one day Sid said to me, “Do you know I just noticed that a little university in Windsor has just started a Judaic Studies department.”
 
BN:        What year was that?
 
MW:      1973 in the fall. “And they’re popping up all over the United States and Canada and we don’t have a thing here.” So I said, “Well Sid, why don’t we start one.” So that was the beginning [laughing]. It took quite a while. The two of us started to approach the university, I believe it was then Dean Will, no they came later, I can’t remember who it was we first talked to, they said, “Well, see where you can put a program and then we’ll talk.” So we visited a number of departments, the History department. They were very much interested but at that time they were looking for one or two positions in intellectual history and they said that when we’ve filled those, come and talk to us. Well we weren’t going to wait, we went to the Philosophy department and although the head of the department was very, very interested he was very democratic and he called all the faculty together and Sid and I made a presentation, or it’s possible by that time Rob Krell who was a professor of Psychiatry at UBC had joined us, he had heard we were starting this and he wanted to help out so the three of us probably talked to the Philosophy department and it was the faculty that said no such thing as Jewish philosophy...that, by the way, was a Jewish professor. Talk about ignorance, anyway we were pretty upset. Then I got a phone call from Professor Bill Nicholls who had not too long before that time, this was ’73, had been made head of a Department of Religious Studies which he founded, he was the first head of that department and he said, “I hear you’re looking for a home for a Judaic Studies program, what’s the matter with Religious Studies?” Well we knew about Religious Studies but we had decided not to pursue that because we didn’t know, it was such a young department, we didn’t know what academic and scholarly credibility it had. However we were desperate and so we met with Bill Nicholls and he was absolutely...he was just so enthusiastic about the idea of having a professor of Judaic Studies on his faculty, in his department.

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Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.04154

Two black and white images, one with caption, of the Physics Building at the University of British Columbia. Photo caption continues, "The principal feature of the millwork required for this building was the architecturally detailed counters and fixtures."

Date: 
[1955]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara
Posted by jyuhasz
Object id: 
LF.04145

Black and white image of the University of British Columbia's Memorial Gym, a large rectangular building with flat roof and windows along upper portion of three sides. Caption on photo continues "the outstanding features in this project includes the extensive use of shaped hardwood handrailing and extensive use of circular seating in edged fir grain."

Date: 
[1955]
Source: 
Landauer, Barbara